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Mending fences of Rwenzururu kingdom with government

Mending fences of Rwenzururu kingdom with government

The return of His Majesty Charles Mumbere Iremangoma, The King of the Obusinga Bwa Rwenzururu (OBR) Cultural Institution, marks the beginning of a new chapter in the history of the Bakonzo people, and more specifically, the Rwenzururu Kingdom’s relationship with the government in power, as well as with other cultural Institutions both within and outside the country. This ear of improved relations also extends to other ethnic groups, academic institutions, security agencies, and Civil society groups, all of which can play a role in facilitating reconciliation between the OBR and the government. The process of mending these facets necessitates a comprehensive overhaul in the perception and pursuit of various structural […]

Tinyafayo II: Reloaded

Tinyafayo II: Reloaded

The Story: Five years ago, Tinfayo recruited a farm manager, one Magezi. Magezi managed the farm according to his own wishes and aspirations – largely side linning Tinfayo. However, it is now recruitment time for workers on the farm: Mr. Magezi (current farm manager) travels to seek contract renewal from Mr. Tinfayo; Mucunguzi has learnt for the last 5 years on how the farm has been managed and wants to compete and take the job of the farm manager from Mr. Magezi. …What will happen… …. Click to Access Document

Newsletter: November 2023

Newsletter: November 2023

In this month’s newsletter, we are thrilled to share inspiring stories of resilience, collaboration, and positive transformation from various initiatives supported by KRC-Uganda. Starting with the powerful journey of Rebecca Anyesi, a 37-year-old mother of five a member of the Tujikaze care group, embodies the success of the Maternal Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) intervention. Through nutrition education, Rebecca transformed her family’s well-being, embracing self-reliance in vegetable cultivation using the Optimize Land Use Model. Transitioning to the Kyaka II refugee settlement, the Kulea Watoto Project takes center stage, addressing malnutrition through community dialogues. Collaborative efforts identifycauses and implement actionable approaches, creating a sustainable and nourishing environment. Engaging both community members […]

Newsletter: October 2023

Newsletter: October 2023

Dear Reader,In this issue, meet Majara Samuel, a youth champion from Kyegegwa district who found success through the Markets for Youth project. Starting with a lawn mower, he now serves various clients and encourages youth to join VSLAs for a better life; An unexpected turn led an individual to embrace agriculture. With the help of the Kahondo Youth Development Group and KRC-Uganda’s training, they diversified into pig farming and vegetable cultivation, creating opportunities for themselves and others; The Kahondo Youth Development Group’s journey, beginning with ten members, has grown to 45 through teamwork and training. They’ve expanded their agricultural initiatives, forming a group busi ness plan, and contributing to a […]

Newsletter: September 2023

Newsletter: September 2023

Dear esteemed reader,In this edition of our newsletter, we shine a spotlight on the remarkable initiatives led by KRC-Uganda and her partners, driving positive change in the Rwenzori region and beyond. These initiatives are not only transforming the lives of smallholder farmers but also contributing to the broader goal of sustainable food systems, market systems, improved nutrition and livelihoods in Uganda. LEVERAGING VSLA METHODOLOGY FOR SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMSKRC-Uganda with support from organizations like HUMUNDI, is implementing a microfinance program in the Rwenzori region. The program aims to empower smallholder farmers by utilizing the Village Savings and Loans Association (VSLA) approach. VSLA involves organizing 25-30 community members from the same village […]

Putting the future of Uganda’s agriculture and agricultural cooperatives into perspective

Putting the future of Uganda’s agriculture and agricultural cooperatives into perspective

Growing up as a child in a farming household in the late 60s through the 70s, it was rare to hear dad or mum decrying lack or scarcity of money as it is nowadays for many families. For some reason for sure, many farm families derived their income from a certain cash crop, but I also recall that most of the social services were provided freely or subsidized by the government as a public good. As a young boy, I witnessed how farming was a profitable venture. Without due regard to the current gender jargon, allow me to mention that my late Father was a chairman of a primary Coffee Cooperative Society. […]